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Rogue cellular towers and phony base stations long have been a tradition of researchers at Black Hat and DEF CON, who test and demonstrate how they can intercept or manipulate cellphones, but a team of researchers has found a deeper problem of major secur

Way for Phones to be Contolled is Built In

July 31, 2014 3:23 pm | by Kelly Jackson Higgins, Dark Reading | News | Comments

Rogue cellular towers and phony base stations long have been a tradition of researchers at Black Hat and DEF CON, who test and demonstrate how they can intercept or manipulate cellphones, but a team of researchers has found a deeper problem of major security vulnerabilities in the client control software running on the majority of mobile phones around the world.

Inside Citizen Lab, the 'Hacker Hothouse'

July 31, 2014 2:59 pm | by Joshua Kopstein, Ars Technica | News | Comments

From exposing the espionage ring that hacked the Dalai Lama to uncovering the commercial spyware...

Checking In from Home Leaves Entry for Hackers

July 31, 2014 2:48 pm | by Nicole Perlroth, The New York Times | News | Comments

The same tools that help millions of Americans work from home are being exploited by cyber...

Squirrelling Away Plists

July 31, 2014 2:36 pm | by Editor | Blogs | Comments

Plists are Apple's way of retaining configuration information. They're scattered throughout OS X...

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Researchers at Dell SecureWorks have uncovered what they believe to be a Chinese hacking group specifically focused on stealing source code from video game companies, either in order to crack or cheat at particular games or to use in competing products.

Chinese Hackers Use APTs to Target Gaming Companies

July 31, 2014 10:01 am | by Infosecurity | News | Comments

Researchers at Dell SecureWorks have uncovered what they believe to be a Chinese hacking group specifically focused on stealing source code from video game companies, either in order to crack or cheat at particular games or to use in competing products.

Gathering and understanding cyber intelligence is the work of BlackForest, a new open source intelligence gathering system developed by information security specialists at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI). By using such information to create a t

Threat Information System Warns of Impending Cyber Attacks

July 31, 2014 9:46 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Gathering and understanding cyber intelligence is the work of BlackForest, a new open source intelligence gathering system developed by information security specialists at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI). By using such information to create a threat picture, BlackForest helps corporations, government agencies and nonprofit organizations battle increasingly-sophisticated threats to their networks.

Feds Admit Cooperation Remains Obstacle with Corporations, Cyber Threats

July 31, 2014 9:26 am | by Tom Fontaine, Trib LIVE | News | Comments

A key to reducing cyber crime is getting victims — often major corporations — to cooperate with authorities, two top federal law enforcement officials said during visits to Pittsburgh.                   

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Digital forensic science is not a matter of recovering a file that proves   somebody’s guilt; it is about wading through hundreds of thousands, possibly   millions, of a wide variety of digital artifacts and making very pointed   critical judgments about

Find the Context

July 30, 2014 3:50 pm | Articles | Comments

Digital forensic science is not a matter of recovering a file that proves somebody’s guilt; it is about wading through hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of a wide variety of digital artifacts and making very pointed critical judgments about which provide some sort of inculpatory or exculpatory evidence relevant to the case.

I'm writing this review as someone who has used Volatility for some time, albeit not to it's fullest possible extent. I'm more of an incident responder, and not so much a malware reverse engineer; I tend to work with some really good malware RE folks and

Book Review: 'The Art of Memory Forensics'

July 30, 2014 3:23 pm | by Harlan Carvey | Blogs | Comments

I'm writing this review as someone who has used Volatility for some time, albeit not to it's fullest possible extent. I'm more of an incident responder, and not so much a malware reverse engineer; I tend to work with some really good malware RE folks and usually go to them for the deeper stuff. 

Officials with the Tor privacy service have uncovered an attack that may have revealed identifying information or other clues of people operating or accessing anonymous websites and other services over a five-month span beginning in February.

Tor Attack Tried to Uncover Users for Five Months

July 30, 2014 3:11 pm | by Dan Goodin, Ars Technica | News | Comments

Officials with the Tor privacy service have uncovered an attack that may have revealed identifying information or other clues of people operating or accessing anonymous websites and other services over a five-month span beginning in February. 

Cyber criminals have been launching DDoS attacks from Amazon cloud-based bots after gaining access via a known vulnerability in open source search engine Elasticsearch, according to researchers.

DDoS-ers Launch Attacks from Amazon EC2

July 30, 2014 2:59 pm | by Infosecurity | News | Comments

Cyber criminals have been launching DDoS attacks from Amazon cloud-based bots after gaining access via a known vulnerability in open source search engine Elasticsearch, according to researchers.               

If you’re making a phone call with your iPhone, you used to have two options: Accept the notion that any wiretapper, hacker or spook can listen in on your conversations, or pay for pricey voice encryption software. As of today there’s a third option.

iPhone App Makes Free, Encrypted Calls

July 30, 2014 9:55 am | by Andy Greenberg, Wired | News | Comments

If you’re making a phone call with your iPhone, you used to have two options: Accept the notion that any wiretapper, hacker or spook can listen in on your conversations, or pay for pricey voice encryption software. As of today there’s a third option.

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Muneeb Akhter is under investigation after admitting that he inflated the value of gift cards for companies including K-Mart, Shell Gas, Whole Foods, Starbucks and Dunkin Donuts, all without spending any money to do it.

Guy Brags about Gift Card Tinkering at New Job, Gets House Raided by Feds

July 30, 2014 9:21 am | by Lisa Vaas | Blogs | Comments

Muneeb Akhter is under investigation after admitting that he inflated the value of gift cards for companies including K-Mart, Shell Gas, Whole Foods, Starbucks and Dunkin Donuts, all without spending any money to do it.         

In an interview with former National Security Agency Director General Keith Alexander, Foreign Policy's Shane Harris learned that Alexander plans to file “at least” nine patent applications — “and possibly more" — pertaining to technology for detecting ne

Former NSA Director to File Cybersecurity Patents in the Private World

July 30, 2014 9:08 am | by Megan Guess, Ars Technica | News | Comments

In an interview with former National Security Agency Director General Keith Alexander, Foreign Policy's Shane Harris learned that Alexander plans to file “at least” nine patent applications — “and possibly more" — pertaining to technology for detecting network intruders.

Hackers Plundered Israeli Defense Firms that Built 'Iron Dome' Missile Defense System

July 30, 2014 8:36 am | by Editor | Blogs | Comments

Three Israeli defense contractors responsible for building the “Iron Dome” missile shield currently protecting Israel from a barrage of rocket attacks were compromised by hackers and robbed of huge quantities of sensitive documents pertaining to the shield technology.

While the word “forensics” might conjure up images of collecting hair or fingerprints from crime scenes, the scope of forensic science extends beyond the physical into almost any realm. If you need to discover the weather patterns in the past, you need so

The Budding Science of Chatroom Forensics

July 29, 2014 4:34 pm | by Ben Richmond. Motherboard | News | Comments

While the word “forensics” might conjure up images of collecting hair or fingerprints from crime scenes, the scope of forensic science extends beyond the physical into almost any realm. If you need to discover the weather patterns in the past, you need some forensic meteorology. Forensic accounting uncovers book-cookery. And down in Australia, they're working on forensic text comparison in order to catch pedophiles.

High-level Chinese hackers recently tried to break into a key Canadian computer system, forcing Ottawa to isolate it from the main government network, a senior official said on Tuesday.

Canada Says China Tried to Hack into Key Computer System

July 29, 2014 11:12 am | by Reuters | News | Comments

High-level Chinese hackers recently tried to break into a key Canadian computer system, forcing Ottawa to isolate it from the main government network, a senior official said on Tuesday.                   

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Cookies are an essential part of the way the web works and occupy a pivotal position in the online privacy arms race. Organizations who want to track and profile people give them cookies and users who don't want to be tracked disable or delete them. But w

Panopticlick Reveals the Cookie You Can't Delete

July 29, 2014 10:36 am | by Mark Stockley | Blogs | Comments

Cookies are an essential part of the way the web works and occupy a pivotal position in the online privacy arms race. Organizations who want to track and profile people give them cookies and users who don't want to be tracked disable or delete them. But what if there was a cookie you couldn't delete, and what if the steps you took to guard your privacy made you easier to track?

Federal Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) and information security executives face a number of challenges in today's dynamic, fast-paced environment.

How to Build a Federal Information Security Team

July 29, 2014 10:01 am | by (ISC)2 Writers Bureau, Information Week | News | Comments

Federal Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) and information security executives face a number of challenges in today's dynamic, fast-paced environment. These challenges include advanced persistent threats, system vulnerabilities, and regulatory compliance, to name a few.

It has been over a year since The Guardian reported the first story on the National Security Agency’s surveillance programs based on the leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, yet the national conversation remains largely mired in a simplistic d

Surveillance Costs: The NSA's Impact on the Economy, Internet Freedom & Cybersecurity

July 29, 2014 9:42 am | by Danielle Kehl,Kevin Bankston,Robyn Greene,Robert Morgus,New America Foundation | News | Comments

It has been over a year since The Guardian reported the first story on the National Security Agency’s surveillance programs based on the leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, yet the national conversation remains largely mired in a simplistic debate over the tradeoffs between national security and individual privacy. It is time to start weighing the overall costs and benefits more broadly.

Every law firm can run into incidents of employee misconduct, data breaches, and intellectual property theft. In the age of modern technology, data breaches, insider trading, and other security problems require extensive technological forensics.

Data Breaches, eDiscovery, and the Importance of Digital Forensics

July 29, 2014 9:07 am | by Editor | Blogs | Comments

Every law firm can run into incidents of employee misconduct, data breaches, and intellectual property theft. In the age of modern technology, data breaches, insider trading, and other security problems require extensive technological forensics.

Stalking Predators Online Stresses Cyber Cops

July 28, 2014 11:11 am | by Maya Lau, The Times | News | Comments

To string along suspected sex offenders, Bryan Montgomery carries out intimate conversations with them — sometimes lasting a year — while posing as a juvenile on social media. The job brings psychological stress, which Montgomery acknowledges. 

The Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD) has offered a 3.9 million ruble (approximately $111,000) contract for technology that can identify the users of Tor, the encrypted anonymizing network used by Internet users seeking to hide their activities f

Russia Offers $111,000 Bounty to Break Tor Privacy

July 28, 2014 10:56 am | by Sean Gallagher, Ars Technica | News | Comments

The Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD) has offered a 3.9 million ruble (approximately $111,000) contract for technology that can identify the users of Tor, the encrypted anonymizing network used by Internet users seeking to hide their activities from monitoring by law enforcement, government censors, and others.

Cybersecurity is being pushed in two directions. On the one hand, the growing complexity of information systems and the onslaught of threats facing them are putting a premium on speed. Automation is the future of security.

Security Automation: Are Humans Still Relevant?

July 28, 2014 10:38 am | by William Jackson | Blogs | Comments

Cybersecurity is being pushed in two directions. On the one hand, the growing complexity of information systems and the onslaught of threats facing them are putting a premium on speed. Automation is the future of security.       

SiQuest Corporation has added a feature to its Internet Examiner Toolkit (IXTK). With the current release of Version 4.0.1407.2503, IXTK now forensically recovers evidence of “watched YouTube videos” from the Unallocated Space and browser cache repositori

Software Forensically Recovers Watched YouTube Videos

July 28, 2014 10:32 am | by John Bradley | SiQuest Corporation | News | Comments

SiQuest Corporation has added a feature to its Internet Examiner Toolkit (IXTK). With the current release of Version 4.0.1407.2503, IXTK now forensically recovers evidence of “watched YouTube videos” from the Unallocated Space and browser cache repositories of computer hard drives, and the YouTube website directly.

The prospect that classified capabilities could be revealed in a criminal case has meant that the most sophisticated surveillance technologies are not always available to law enforcement because they are classified, current and former.

How Spy Agencies Keep Their 'Toys' from Law Enforcement

July 28, 2014 10:05 am | by Ellen Nakashima, The Washington Post | News | Comments

The prospect that classified capabilities could be revealed in a criminal case has meant that the most sophisticated surveillance technologies are not always available to law enforcement because they are classified, current and former.    

Recently, a hacker who's been campaigning to make a point about Apple security by playing fast and loose with the now widely-accepted definition of "backdoor" struck gold when journalists didn't do their homework and erroneously reported a diagnostic mech

The Apple Backdoor that Wasn't

July 28, 2014 9:04 am | by Violet Blue | Blogs | Comments

Recently, a hacker who's been campaigning to make a point about Apple security by playing fast and loose with the now widely-accepted definition of "backdoor" struck gold when journalists didn't do their homework and erroneously reported a diagnostic mechanism as a nefarious, malfeasant, secret opening to their private data.

Today we’ll discuss the challenges of testifying as an expert witness. As you work a case you must assume that you will be called to testify at trial.

Talk Forensics - Expert Witness Testimony

July 28, 2014 8:33 am | Videos | Comments

Today we’ll discuss the challenges of testifying as an expert witness. As you work a case you must assume that you will be called to testify at trial.                             

Have the UK police successfully broken anonymity on the internet? They certainly seemed to imply as much when the National Crime Agency proudly announced recently that it had made 660 arrests after an operation to identify people viewing indecent images o

Have Police Really Cracked Tor?

July 25, 2014 11:03 am | by Eerke Boiten and Julio Hernandez-Castro, The Conversation | News | Comments

Have the UK police successfully broken anonymity on the internet? They certainly seemed to imply as much when the National Crime Agency proudly announced recently that it had made 660 arrests after an operation to identify people viewing indecent images of children online. The announcement raises questions about just how anonymous it is possible to be online.

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